What is HTML5?

We’re sure by now you’ve heard the term “HTML5″ thrown around by the likes of Apple and Google. This is the next evolution of HTML, or Hyper Text Markup Language, which forms the backbone of almost every site on the Internet. HTML4, the last major iteration of the language, debuted in 1997 and has been subsequently poked and prodded so that it can handle the demands of the modern Web.

HTML4 has been tweaked, stretched and augmented beyond its initial scope to bring high levels of interactivity and multimedia to Web sites. Plugins like Flash, Silverlight and Java have added media integration to the Web, but not without some cost. In search of a “better user experience” and battery life, Apple has simply dropped support for some of these plugins entirely on mobile devices, leaving much of the media-heavy Internet inaccessible on iPads and iPhones. HTML5 adds many new features, and streamlines functionality in order to render these processor-intensive add-ons unnecessary for many common functions.

Assuming content providers sign on (and many are), this means you won’t have to worry about installing yet another plugin just to listen to a song embedded in a blog or watch a video on YouTube. Similarly, this is a big deal for platforms that either don’t support Flash (e.g., iPhone and iPad), or have well documented problems with it (e.g., Linux). It will be a particular boon to those smartphones for which supporting Flash has proven problematic.

Rough Timeline of Web Technologies

1991 HTML
1994 HTML2
1996 CSS1 + JavaScript
1997 HTML4
1998 CSS2
2000 XHTML1
2002 Tableless Web Design
2005 AJAX
2009 HTML5


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This is the full list of Android Malware in a very dangerous year, since August, the 9th 2011 up-to-today. One year ago (9 August 2010) Kaspersky discovered the first SMS Trojan for Android in the Wild dubbed SMS.AndroidOS.FakePlayer.a. This is considered a special date for the Google Mobile OS because before then, Android Malware was a little bit more than an exercise of Style, essentially focused on Spyware. After that, everything changed and mobile malware targeting the Android OS become more and more sophisticated.

This compilation shows the long malware trail which characterized the hard days for information security. Looking at the graph, the climax was Android.Geinimi (end of 2010), featuring the characteristics of a primordial Botnet, but also Android.DroidDream (AKA RootCager) is worthwhile mentioning because of its capability to root the phone and potentially install applications remotely without direct user intervention.


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Traditional hard disk drives or HDDs, have moving parts that take time to get from point A to point B. Think of them aa Cassette tape, it takes time to get from the part of the song you were listening to, to the part you want to be at. While a HDD is many times faster than a cassette drive they are both loosely based on the same magnetic recording technology. Unlike a Cassette, a hard disk platter can spin up to 170 MPH to find the appropriate information you are looking for. This can vary based on the number of rotations per minute or RPM that the platter can do (between 3,000 all the way up to 15,000 for high performance servers). To improve performance even further people began defragmenting their hard disk drives in order to put the most important information on the “outside of the HDD” where the platter could find it the quickest. Despite what may seem like a fast way to do things, consumers have experienced the drag that even the fastest hard disk drive could not rectify. This is where Solid State Drives come in.


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If you’ve stayed with friends who live in European cities, you’ve probably had an experience like this: You hop onto their WiFi or wired internet connection and realize it’s really fast. Way faster than the one that you have at home. It might even make your own DSL or cable connection feel as sluggish as dialup.

You ask them how much they pay for broadband.
“Oh, forty Euros.” That’s about $56.
“A week?” you ask.
“No,” they might say. “Per month. And that includes phone and TV.”

It’s really that bad. The nation that invented the internet ranks 16th in the world when it comes to the speed and cost of our broadband connections. That’s according to a study released last year by Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society on behalf of the FCC.

Engadget did a full coverage on this matter. Video and full report inside.


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The first candidate is Ortus Technology that have released a Full HD MID-scale panel. The 4.8-inch display runs at 1920 x 1080 resolution for a whopping 458 pixels per inch; which in contrast, makes Apple’s 326ppi Retina Display look low-res.


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Today is the 137th birthday of a greatest illusionist and a magician Harry Houdini. He became known for his famous performance – The Milk Can Escape. Houdini would be handcuffed and sealed inside an over-sized milk can filled with water and make his escape behind a curtain. As part of the effect, Houdini would invite members of the audience to hold their breath along with him while he was inside the can. Advertised with dramatic posters that proclaimed “Failure Means A Drowning Death”, the escape proved to be a sensation.

In this post we reveal this trick, along with many others mostly developed by David Copperfield.


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This post is full of games from the 90ies. I’ve posted most of the popular games, but if you feel that I missed something, please feel free to add it in the comments.


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Some boring people say that the standard in-car stereo is more than enough for their needs. Those people are probably not considering driving as an art, or enjoyment, or relaxation and most certainly not as an adrenaline rush; but rather as a simple “getting from point A to point B” type of deal. I don’t judge. But those of us who do find it exhilarating and the best event of the day, know that to accommodate those expectations, would not only require a kick-ass car, but also a best entertainment system money can buy.


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Drift – an adrenaline punch!

Drifting refers to a driving technique and to a motorsport where the driver intentionally over steers, causing loss of traction in the rear wheels through turns, while maintaining vehicle control and a high exit speed. A car is drifting when the rear slip angle is greater than the front slip angle prior to the corner apex, and the front wheels are pointing in the opposite direction to the turn (e.g. car is turning left, wheels are pointed right or vice versa), and the driver is controlling these factors. As a motor sport, professional drifting competitions are held worldwide. Drift racing challenges drivers to navigate a course in a sustained sideslip by exploiting coupled nonlinearities in the tire force response.

This post is made up of the drifting history, reasons for such an insane popularity demonstrating some of the greatest drift moves ever recorded on video; and revealing some of the biggest names in this unique sport.


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Ever wanted to capture your ride? Have the bragging rights of your awesomeness?! Snowboarding, biking, skateboarding, surfing, car driving (drift, race, etc)… Most definitely you need a water resistance camera that has a solid and stable mount to your helmet, but preferably to any surface.
Unquestionably you would want to capture your one-in-a-life time move in full high definition, so that your friends would identify themselves in the captures footage. Perhaps two of the most vivid competitors in the helmet camera market are GoPro HD and Contour HD.


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