Photo tech firm Scalado has revealed its latest smartphone camera app, Remove, capable of automatically identifying and removing objects in-frame, and perfect for deleting an unwanted uncle from your family gathering. Remove, billed as the world’s first optical removal software for smartphones, builds a composite shot from multiple frames captured in swift succession, picking out possible flaws – such as passing cars or people – and letting you delete them with a tap of the screen.

In fact, Remove can be set to automatically delete any problems it identifies, though you can switch over to manual mode if you decide you’d like to keep something in-frame instead. Obviously the problems themselves have to be moving, since Scalado is cutting out transient objects based on a stationary background.


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Watching Aurasma in action is very impressive, it is tech that looks like magic. Aurasma is software that picks out objects, shapes, symbols — which are called triggers — with its Virtual Browser and understands what they are. Once the trigger is recognized, relevant content gets pushed across to the user using enhanced reality. For example, we have a look at a $20 bill during our demo and the bill in the phone display starts to deconstruct ending in some pretty serious rah rah sis boom bah. Aurasma is getting traction in advertising and we can only see this growing, it is really addictive fun. Users can grab the app free on either iOS or Android — another mobile platform is coming with a name that doesn’t rhyme with BlackBerry — and get playing and creating. Aurasma also has a pro version — also free — with much more serious development tours for folks that really want to stretch its boundaries. Aurasma has been around for a while now but this is the first chance we’ve had a demo and we were very impressed. Click through to see money do crazy things and a Harry Potter poster come to life.


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In photography, bokeh is the blur or the aesthetic quality of the blur, in out-of-focus areas of an image, or “the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light.” Here is a compilation of pictures of this genre. Enjoy!


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What’s former Facebook CPO Chris Kelly doing post-Democratic Attorney General run? Why backing a feature length film shot on a smartphone of course! The film, called Olive, went up on Kickstarter today and was shot entirely using a Nokia N8 phone and a specially crafted 35mm lens.

Director Hooman Khalili tells me that what differentiates Olive from other films that have tried the whole “movie shot on a smartphone” gimmick — like The Wrong Ferrari – is that he intends to show the film in theatres. Khalili even wants to submit it for Oscar consideration — which would be a first for a smartphone-shot film.

Olive’s narrative centres around a mysterious little girl that doesn’t speak, and three strangers whose lives she positively affects. Indie actress Gena Rowlands and (another former Facebooker) Randi Zuckerberg also star. The film itself is actually finished, having been financed by Kelly and Bill O’Keefe. The $300K it raises on Kickstarter will go towards distribution, and Khalili 100% guarantees that the film will make at least some big screens after its premier this month.


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It’s been quite a day for all you cinephiles out there. First Canon outed its pair of Cinema EOS cameras, and now RED has finally released the Epic’s baby sister Scarlet. Scarlet packs a similar punch as her older brother, so she takes 5K (5120 x 2700) resolution stills at 12fps, or can shoot your next cinematic masterpiece in 4K (4096 x 2160) at 25fps. The Scarlet also can use all of the Epic’s accessories and comes with a Canon mount so there’s plenty of glass to choose from, too. Best of all, Scarlet can be all yours for the low price of $9,750. That’s right, for the price of a used Honda Civic, you can shoot video that essentially looks as good as those made by pros like Peter Jackson and John Shwartzman (assuming you’ve got their moviemaking skills).


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Diet and filmmaking legend Peter Jackson’s given us another insight into the making of the Hobbit movies, and this time he’s talking about his envious collection of tech. Filming with no less than 48 Red Epic cameras at 48fps in full 5k resolution might sound fantastic, but it hasn’t all been a bed of cotton candy. Two 3D cameras need to be mounted at the same “interocular” (the inch-or-so distance between your eyes) which is impossible given the size of the Epic and its lenses. The team had to hire specialist firm 3ality to build a rig where one camera shoots the action and the other is pointed vertically at a mirror. Those who would love to shoot with an Epic should also beware that the cameras naturally desaturate the action to such an extent that the makeup, costume and set design teams have to over-color everything to look natural in post production. Full video is inside, try not to imagine how many years bad luck you’d get if you broke one of those mirrors during a key scene.


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Go easy on the gas, Speed Racer, because Cordon is on its way. Developed by Simicon, this new speed sensor promises to take highway surveillance to new heights of precision. Unlike most photo radar systems, which track only one violator at a time, Simicon’s device can simultaneously identify and follow up to 32 vehicles across four lanes. Whenever a car enters its range, the Cordon will automatically generate two images: one from wide-angle view and one closeup shot of the vehicle’s license plate. It’s also capable of instantly measuring a car’s speed and mapping its position, and can easily be synced with other databases via WiFi, 3G or WiMAX. Plus, this device is compact and durable enough to be mounted upon a tripod or atop a road sign, making it even harder for drivers to spot. Fortunately, though, you still have time to change your dragster ways, as distributor Peak Gain Systems won’t be bringing the Cordon to North America until the first quarter of 2012. You will find a footage of a field trial that’s currently underway inside. Cars tagged with a green dot are travelling below the speed limit, those with a yellow marking are chugging along within an acceptable range above the limit, while vehicles with a red tab are just asking for trouble.


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Stick a piece of gaffer tape over the unmistakable X, and Canon’s latest EOS-1D pro-level camera will look virtually identical to every 1D model that came before it. But once you flip up the power slider, this new king of the jungle will hum like no other. Canon’s phenomenally powerful EOS-1D X really sounds like the DSLR to rule them all. Its 18 megapixel full-frame sensor uses oversized pixels to battle noise and is supported by a pair of Digic 5+ imaging processors, which also help drive a 61-point high density reticular AF system, a top ISO setting of 204,000 (51,200 native), a 252-zone metering system, a 14 fps JPEG (or 12 fps RAW) burst mode and a built-in wired gigabit LAN connection, for remote shooting and image transfer. The camera’s curious single-letter name represents a trio of industry milestones: the X is the 10th generation Canon professional SLR (dating back to the F1 in the 1970s), it’s a crossover model, filling in for both the 1D Mark IV and 1Ds Mark III (which has been discontinued), and, well, it sounds to be pretty darn “Xtreme.”


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HDR. Splendid.

Magnificent and stunning HDR compilation for the mid-October festivities.


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It isn’t the first ball camera we’ve seen, nor is it the first camera to hawk 360-degree panoramas. But, the Throwable Panoramic Ball Camera marries these two concepts together, and packs them into a sturdy-looking sphere made mostly of foam. This shields the 36 fixed-focus phone camera modules, each capable of taking two megapixel snapshots. These are then stitched together to create full panoramic works like the shot above. Somewhere within that squishy core is an accelerometer to measure the apex of its flight, and where the camera array will capture its image. The big question is, can it survive a few rounds of keepie-uppie? You can take a closer look at the ball camera’s 36 x two megapixel images in the video below.


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With their tiny lenses and even tinier sensors, will cellphone cameras ever be able to take photos as good as those from SLRs and Micro Four Thirds cameras? The quality has all but been taken care of with the latest phone-cams, but there’s one problem common to all point-and-shoots: Their tremendous depth-of-field. A patent from Samsung shows how this could be fixed. For small sensors they propose to use two cameras in a phone, almost like a stereoscopic 3D camera. The main one takes the shot as usual whilst a lower resolution camera takes another shot. The offset between them lets the camera work out the depth of anything in the frame. This information is then processed and digital blur applied to wash out the background.


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Summer! The time when nature blossoms, temperature rises, water splashes and warm sand awaits.
Enjoy some of the life-stills captured this summer. Happy Sunday!


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HDR video, as you know, exposes the living breathing smelling unreality hidden in life. Or something like that. AMP’s system uses a two beam-splitter in the camera that takes the light and directs it onto three sensors. This gives it a range of 17.5 stops to “reveal reality” in our drab, incomplete lives. The single-lens camera shoots 1080p video at 24fps or 30fps, records raw, uncompressed data to an SSD, and works with Nikon F-Mount-compatible lenses. To give you some perspective on the amount of sheer storage required, AMP promises a 256GB SSD can hold 30-plus minutes of footage, with 24fps video consuming less space than the 30 fps variety. It’ll be available later this summer for some unknown sum, but not as a mass-produced product. Rather, it’ll end up in the hands of a select few prosumers who add themselves to a waiting list.


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Visidon’s Applock will prevent the privacy-adverse from messing with your personally curated app collection. Snap a pick with your front-facing cam, enable the face-lock in your settings, and those confidential emails are as good as blocked. It’s far from foolproof, however, as some comments indicate an extended bit of facial-wriggling tricks the app into unlock mode. But it is a great start.


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A Mountain View start-up is promising that its camera, due later this year, will bring the biggest change to photography since the transition from film to digital. The breakthrough is a different type of sensor that captures what are known as light fields — basically, all the light that is moving in all directions in the view of the camera. That offers several advantages over traditional photography, the most revolutionary of which is that photos no longer need to be focused before they are taken.

This means capturing that perfect shot of your fast-moving pet or squirming child could soon get a whole lot easier. Instead of having to manually focus or wait for autofocus to kick in and hopefully centre on the right thing, pictures can be taken immediately and in rapid succession. Once the picture is on a computer or phone, the focus can be adjusted to centre on any object in the image, also allowing for cool artsy shots where one shifts between a blurry foreground and sharp background and vice versa.


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