In photography, bokeh is the blur or the aesthetic quality of the blur, in out-of-focus areas of an image, or “the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light.” Here is a compilation of pictures of this genre. Enjoy!


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Stick a piece of gaffer tape over the unmistakable X, and Canon’s latest EOS-1D pro-level camera will look virtually identical to every 1D model that came before it. But once you flip up the power slider, this new king of the jungle will hum like no other. Canon’s phenomenally powerful EOS-1D X really sounds like the DSLR to rule them all. Its 18 megapixel full-frame sensor uses oversized pixels to battle noise and is supported by a pair of Digic 5+ imaging processors, which also help drive a 61-point high density reticular AF system, a top ISO setting of 204,000 (51,200 native), a 252-zone metering system, a 14 fps JPEG (or 12 fps RAW) burst mode and a built-in wired gigabit LAN connection, for remote shooting and image transfer. The camera’s curious single-letter name represents a trio of industry milestones: the X is the 10th generation Canon professional SLR (dating back to the F1 in the 1970s), it’s a crossover model, filling in for both the 1D Mark IV and 1Ds Mark III (which has been discontinued), and, well, it sounds to be pretty darn “Xtreme.”


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With their tiny lenses and even tinier sensors, will cellphone cameras ever be able to take photos as good as those from SLRs and Micro Four Thirds cameras? The quality has all but been taken care of with the latest phone-cams, but there’s one problem common to all point-and-shoots: Their tremendous depth-of-field. A patent from Samsung shows how this could be fixed. For small sensors they propose to use two cameras in a phone, almost like a stereoscopic 3D camera. The main one takes the shot as usual whilst a lower resolution camera takes another shot. The offset between them lets the camera work out the depth of anything in the frame. This information is then processed and digital blur applied to wash out the background.


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A Mountain View start-up is promising that its camera, due later this year, will bring the biggest change to photography since the transition from film to digital. The breakthrough is a different type of sensor that captures what are known as light fields — basically, all the light that is moving in all directions in the view of the camera. That offers several advantages over traditional photography, the most revolutionary of which is that photos no longer need to be focused before they are taken.

This means capturing that perfect shot of your fast-moving pet or squirming child could soon get a whole lot easier. Instead of having to manually focus or wait for autofocus to kick in and hopefully centre on the right thing, pictures can be taken immediately and in rapid succession. Once the picture is on a computer or phone, the focus can be adjusted to centre on any object in the image, also allowing for cool artsy shots where one shifts between a blurry foreground and sharp background and vice versa.


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You know when you read that you should use a tripod to get the sharpest possible photographs, especially in low light, and you’re all like “Whatever,” and “I have steady hands, dude.”

Well, take a look at this video, which shows just how much you SLR can shake, even when it is on a tripod. Preston Scott at Camera Technica secured a laser pointer to the hotshoe of his Canon 7D and made this video to show you just how wobbly things can get.


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Since we all know that light can not travel through solid objects, we use extra short waves to “scan” the object, such as an X-ray machine for instance. As light passes through the layer (a solid object) it is scattered in both time and space, so an image projected on one side emerges blurry and unfocused on the other. However, Jochen Aulbach at the FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues, have found a way to sharpen things up. They figured that it should be possible to manipulate light so that the scattering it experiences as it passes through the layer leaves it focused.

The team achieved this through a trial and error process. They used a liquid crystal device which allows precise control of light, called a spatial light modulator (SLM), to manipulate 64-femtosecond-long laser pulses being projected onto a layer of paint. A detector measured the intensity and duration of the pulses that emerged from the other side. This information was then passed to a computer program that used it to tweak the SLM to make the next pulse arriving at the detector both brighter and less spread out in time.


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Okii Follow FocusThis $400 knob proves that the DSLR really is the movie camera for today’s new filmmakers – the Oscar (or Emmy anyways) nominees. The Okii Systems USB Follow Focus allows you to control the focus of a Canon DSLR via a mini-USB connection.
Canon’s cameras can be controlled by hooking them up to computers, too, but the Okii knob is arguably more practical on-set, especially as one big point of using an DSLR to shoot video is its small size.

The USB Follow Focus uses the autofocus motor in Canon USM lenses to control focus, even while recording video. This focus control also works in any Live View modes, which can be useful for photography. The nine other switches located around the central focus knob can be used to access important camera functions, such as recording start/stop, digital zoom, engaging autofocus, saving focus points, and adjusting certain camera settings.


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Canon has exhibited the prototype of a new super-telephoto zoom lens, the EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM EXTENDER 1.4x at the CP+ event held in Pacifico Yokahome from February 9 -12, 2001.

The EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM EXTENDER 1.4x will be developed as an L-series super-telephoto lens with an integrated 1.4x extender and high-performance Image Stabilizer technology. The new lens will offer exceptional flexibility by incorporating a built-in 1.4x extender that increases the maximum focal length to 560mm for sports and wildlife photography. High-quality images with high levels of resolution and contrast will be possible through the use of advanced optical materials such as fluorite crystal. The new lens will also include dust- and water-resistant construction designed for extended usage under harsh conditions.


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50mm f/1.2 L

First video (hand-held) shot with Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM Lens

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Here are some shots showing off the softness of this beautiful lens and the incredibly large aperture enabling it to produce astonishing night shots! These pictures are straight from the camera – absolutely no photoshop!

 

 


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