There’s no power outlet, land-based internet connection or even a decent cell signal in sight, yet we’re posting this live, at fast broadband speeds. We’re miles deep into Camp Pendleton, connected to ViaSat’s SurfBeam 2 Pro Portable mobile satellite transceiver and sending data to and from ViaSat-1 located more than 20,000 miles above our heads. SurfBeam 2 wasn’t designed for us to kick back and surf the web in the middle of nowhere at speeds that we could barely achieve while tethered to a cable connection just a few years ago, but we’re doing just that, with ViaSat’s roughly $20,000 go-anywhere satellite broadband rig. We first heard about Pro Portable last month at CES, which the company is marketing towards military, emergency management personnel and even broadcasters — that’s right, the sat truck of the future fits inside a hand-carry suitcase, and sends HD video from the world’s most remote locations right back to broadcast centers at record speed, nearly eliminating that lag that makes certain CNN reports painful to watch.


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It’s been quite a day for all you cinephiles out there. First Canon outed its pair of Cinema EOS cameras, and now RED has finally released the Epic’s baby sister Scarlet. Scarlet packs a similar punch as her older brother, so she takes 5K (5120 x 2700) resolution stills at 12fps, or can shoot your next cinematic masterpiece in 4K (4096 x 2160) at 25fps. The Scarlet also can use all of the Epic’s accessories and comes with a Canon mount so there’s plenty of glass to choose from, too. Best of all, Scarlet can be all yours for the low price of $9,750. That’s right, for the price of a used Honda Civic, you can shoot video that essentially looks as good as those made by pros like Peter Jackson and John Shwartzman (assuming you’ve got their moviemaking skills).


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Diet and filmmaking legend Peter Jackson’s given us another insight into the making of the Hobbit movies, and this time he’s talking about his envious collection of tech. Filming with no less than 48 Red Epic cameras at 48fps in full 5k resolution might sound fantastic, but it hasn’t all been a bed of cotton candy. Two 3D cameras need to be mounted at the same “interocular” (the inch-or-so distance between your eyes) which is impossible given the size of the Epic and its lenses. The team had to hire specialist firm 3ality to build a rig where one camera shoots the action and the other is pointed vertically at a mirror. Those who would love to shoot with an Epic should also beware that the cameras naturally desaturate the action to such an extent that the makeup, costume and set design teams have to over-color everything to look natural in post production. Full video is inside, try not to imagine how many years bad luck you’d get if you broke one of those mirrors during a key scene.


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Stick a piece of gaffer tape over the unmistakable X, and Canon’s latest EOS-1D pro-level camera will look virtually identical to every 1D model that came before it. But once you flip up the power slider, this new king of the jungle will hum like no other. Canon’s phenomenally powerful EOS-1D X really sounds like the DSLR to rule them all. Its 18 megapixel full-frame sensor uses oversized pixels to battle noise and is supported by a pair of Digic 5+ imaging processors, which also help drive a 61-point high density reticular AF system, a top ISO setting of 204,000 (51,200 native), a 252-zone metering system, a 14 fps JPEG (or 12 fps RAW) burst mode and a built-in wired gigabit LAN connection, for remote shooting and image transfer. The camera’s curious single-letter name represents a trio of industry milestones: the X is the 10th generation Canon professional SLR (dating back to the F1 in the 1970s), it’s a crossover model, filling in for both the 1D Mark IV and 1Ds Mark III (which has been discontinued), and, well, it sounds to be pretty darn “Xtreme.”


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HDR video, as you know, exposes the living breathing smelling unreality hidden in life. Or something like that. AMP’s system uses a two beam-splitter in the camera that takes the light and directs it onto three sensors. This gives it a range of 17.5 stops to “reveal reality” in our drab, incomplete lives. The single-lens camera shoots 1080p video at 24fps or 30fps, records raw, uncompressed data to an SSD, and works with Nikon F-Mount-compatible lenses. To give you some perspective on the amount of sheer storage required, AMP promises a 256GB SSD can hold 30-plus minutes of footage, with 24fps video consuming less space than the 30 fps variety. It’ll be available later this summer for some unknown sum, but not as a mass-produced product. Rather, it’ll end up in the hands of a select few prosumers who add themselves to a waiting list.


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While Japan’s NHK has been working on the successor to HDTV, Super Hi-Vision, for years, there haven’t been any direct-view HDTVs capable of showing its full 7,680 x 4,320 pixel resolution until this prototype unveiled today by Sharp. Its 103 pixels per inch may be just a fraction of those found in some of the pocket displays we’ve seen at SID this week, but that’s still far more than the 36ppi of a 60-inch 1080p HDTV. If estimates are correct, we’ll still be waiting until around 2020 for that 33MP video and 22.2 channel sound to actually be broadcast, although there’s a possibility of some demonstrations happening during the 2012 Olympics. Skip past the break for the available specs and a video demonstration, or just head over to the NHK’s Science & Technology Research Laboratories in Tokyo between the 26th and 29th of this month.


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The first candidate is Ortus Technology that have released a Full HD MID-scale panel. The 4.8-inch display runs at 1920 x 1080 resolution for a whopping 458 pixels per inch; which in contrast, makes Apple’s 326ppi Retina Display look low-res.


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We have already done a review of helmet cameras and came to a conclusion that ContourGPS was a better solution in almost all aspects. Well folks from Contour are no lazy bunch, they constantly strive for perfection. On May 18th, you will be able to purchase their latest product Contour+ (formerly known as Countour Plus). Like the ContourGPS, this new imager captures 1080p video at 30fps, and also packs built-in GPS plus Bluetooth v2.1 — the latter’s for the wireless viewfinder app on iOS and, eventually, Android. The difference between these two cameras? Well, ignoring the colors and the extra 3mm in length, the Contour+ does indeed come with a mini HDMI-out port alongside the microSD slot on the back. Better yet, you’ll also find an HDMI cable in the box to get you going. And of course, let’s not forget the new super-wide lens (still rotatable) that does 170 degrees for 960p and 720p recording, or 125 degrees for 1080p. Both modes best the camera’s predecessor, though the trade-off is the lack of dual-alignment lasers.

Update: As of July 20th, Countour wireless viewfinder is available for Android.


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Here is a compiled chart to see how exactly HTC’s latest Android superphone, the Sensation 4G, stacks up against its fellow dual-core competition. Included in this list are the finest and brightest Android handsets from each of the major manufacturers that have gone dual-core so far: the Galaxy S II, the Atrix 4G, the Optimus 2X / G2X, and HTC’s own EVO 3D. As it turns out, there are quite a few commonalities among these phones (besides the benchmark-crushing performance). They all boast screens of either 4 or 4.3 inches in size, the minimum amount of RAM among them is 512MB, the smallest battery is 1500mAh, and yes, they all have front-facing video cameras. Basically, it’s the future of smartphones, reduced to a stat sheet. As such, it must also come with the warning that specs aren’t everything, and user experience will most often depend on the software available on each device and on the preferences of the human holding it.


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When you look at the spec list for the Crystal Acoustics PicoHD5.1 media player you certainly wouldn’t believe that it’s no bigger than an SD card reader. And is actually smaller than its own remote control. There’s just enough space on the device for a few inputs and outputs, including digital audio, HDMI, SD/MMC card slot and an USB port, and it is through this last one that you attach an external source as there’s (clearly) no internal storage on board.

The PicoHD5.1 is compatible with all types of USB memory sticks and FAT, FAT32 or NTFS formatted external HDD drives. It can play a myriad of file types, including MKV, DivX, MP3, FLAC, JPG and BMP, and as it is recognizes NTFS, files can be above 4GB in size (essential for 1080p MKVs, for example). Its 5.1 suffix illustrates that, again seemingly in contradiction to its diminutive size, it can play full surround sound audio. But if you want to use it solely with a flatscreen TV, rather than AV amplifier, it is also capable of downmixing Dolby Digital and DTS audio soundtracks to a stereo mix.

The PicoHD5.1 costs $82 and is available now.


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At this time there is almost all technical data required to talk about AMD’s next Dual-GPU graphics card.

Not a lot of time has passed since AMD announced Radeon 6990, when ATI-Forums.de released the specs for the upcoming Radeon HD 7990. The naming scheme for HD 6900 series cards brought some changes to card positioning. Follow it, the next flagship targeted at Q2 2012 should carry the name of AMD Radeon HD 7990 after successful launch of Radeon HD 6990 – current AMD’s flagship. There is no secret that Radeon HD 7000 line-up will use 28nm process technology manufactured chips, compared to 40nm chips used for latest Radeon HD 6000 products.


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Evo 3D

We’ve been hearing about HTC’s 3D-capable phone for quite a while now. Expected to be announced at CTIA by Sprint, we were able to procure some early shots of the specification listing of the EVO 3D. It’s going to be rocking a muscular 1.2GHz dual core CPU with a large 4.3″ qHD 960×540 3D display. The front camera will be 1.3MP, and the rear will take 1080p 2D video and 720p 3D video. It’ll weigh about 6 ounces, making it a bit heavier than the Thunderbolt.


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Samsung Electronics has tweaked its existing transparent LCD technology to make it energy efficient enough to be powered by ambient light. A working prototype was demoed at CeBIT 2011, one that has a viewable size of 46-inch and supports full HD resolution (1920×1080 pixels) as well as providing with a full ten finger touchscreen surface. The panel, which uses vertical alignment display mode, is an improvement on the see-through LCD panel it showed at the SID 2010 in Seattle, in May last year.

A spokesperson for Samsung Electronics told us that there will be commercial models based on the technology soon and mentioned a fridge freezer as being a potential application. She declined to say whether the innovative solar panel would be rolled out to other similar products. The fact that Samsung has been able to cut down power consumption by such a margin that it can be powered by ambient light is an impressive feat.

Details about the other specifications of the panel – such as power consumption – as well as the position of the backlight unit (which we suspect is positioned at the top of the panel itself) haven’t been revealed.


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The day has come. After much anticipation, AMD has released their new powerhouse flagman – Radeon HD 6990. With a price tag of $699, it certainly deserves a ‘world’s fastest’ title. The 6990 boasts a massive 4GB of GDDR5, 3,072 Stream Processors, 64 ROPs, and an 830MHz core clock speed. A dual-BIOS switch will let you crank that clock up to 880MHz with a corresponding increase in voltage, but don’t expect to see much overclocking headroom above that.


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Smallest HD camera

If you’re looking for a portable camera that can record in HD, look no further. This chinese no-namer is called HDMI Video Pen HD Camcorder. It comes in a shape of a highlighter and is capable of recording 720p resolution videos and 7 megapixel photos. It can also be used as a webcam, by connecting it directly to your TV with a mini-HDMI connector.


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