In photography, bokeh is the blur or the aesthetic quality of the blur, in out-of-focus areas of an image, or “the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light.” Here is a compilation of pictures of this genre. Enjoy!


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Kobundo have displayed Trick Print, a printing technique which combines regular CMYK ink with luminous RGB ink and can be printed in one pass without requiring offset printing. In a trick print, the image printed with CMYK ink is visible under regular light, and if the image is viewed under a black light the image printed in the RGB ink is displayed. This allows for a wide variety of possible uses.

Black lights have long been used in nightclubs and other places to illuminate things to make them shine. But they just shone and weren’t particularly beautiful. We use it to make it possible to show colors that shine on a TV screen as accurate natural colors with RGB. Color can appear on blank areas of a piece of paper, and here we are also showing that by changing the lighting we can turn a black and white image into a full color image, so these are the two main points we are showing.


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At one time if you wanted a handheld flashlight with enough lumens to stop a deer in its tracks you had to settle for a long Maglite filled with D-sized batteries, or a lantern like solution tethered to a massive 12-volt battery. This gave you only about 160 lumens. But then LEDs came along, and now you can get a flashlight as compact as the SureFire UB3T Invictus that kicks out an impressive 800 lumens at its highest setting. Of course that much output will eat through the batteries in just 1.7 hours, so thankfully it also has 8 selectable brightness levels, with the lowest (2 lumens) giving you about 150 hours of illumination.


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Scientists have shown off a “cloaking device” that makes objects invisible – to sound waves. Such acoustic cloaking was proposed theoretically in 2008 but has only this year been put into practice.

Described in Physical Review Letters, the approach borrows many ideas from attempts to “cloak” objects from light. It uses simple plastic sheets with arrays of holes, and could be put to use in making ships invisible to sonar or in acoustic design of concert halls.


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HDR video, as you know, exposes the living breathing smelling unreality hidden in life. Or something like that. AMP’s system uses a two beam-splitter in the camera that takes the light and directs it onto three sensors. This gives it a range of 17.5 stops to “reveal reality” in our drab, incomplete lives. The single-lens camera shoots 1080p video at 24fps or 30fps, records raw, uncompressed data to an SSD, and works with Nikon F-Mount-compatible lenses. To give you some perspective on the amount of sheer storage required, AMP promises a 256GB SSD can hold 30-plus minutes of footage, with 24fps video consuming less space than the 30 fps variety. It’ll be available later this summer for some unknown sum, but not as a mass-produced product. Rather, it’ll end up in the hands of a select few prosumers who add themselves to a waiting list.


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A Mountain View start-up is promising that its camera, due later this year, will bring the biggest change to photography since the transition from film to digital. The breakthrough is a different type of sensor that captures what are known as light fields — basically, all the light that is moving in all directions in the view of the camera. That offers several advantages over traditional photography, the most revolutionary of which is that photos no longer need to be focused before they are taken.

This means capturing that perfect shot of your fast-moving pet or squirming child could soon get a whole lot easier. Instead of having to manually focus or wait for autofocus to kick in and hopefully centre on the right thing, pictures can be taken immediately and in rapid succession. Once the picture is on a computer or phone, the focus can be adjusted to centre on any object in the image, also allowing for cool artsy shots where one shifts between a blurry foreground and sharp background and vice versa.


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Solar powered furniture is nothing new, but this crazy looking rocking lounge chair created by architecture students at MIT adds a couple of unique features. These curved, solar-panel-covered seats rotate on an axis to keep them facing the sun, generating additional energy from the rocking motion created when people climb inside.

Named the SOFT Rocker, the chair has a 35-watt solar panel that charges a built in battery, so you can still get juice from its built in USB ports after the sun goes down. You can even use the battery to light up the inside of the loop Tron style, adding some groovy atmosphere.


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Mark this day, folks, because the brainiacs have finally made a breakthrough in quantum teleportation: a team of scientists from Australia and Japan have successfully transferred a complex set of quantum data in light form. You see, previously researchers had struggled with slow performance or loss of information, but with full transmission integrity achieved — as in blocks of qubits being destroyed in one place but instantaneously resurrected in another, without affecting their superpositions — we’re now one huge step closer to secure, high-speed quantum communication. Needless to say, this will also be a big boost for the development of powerful quantum computing, and combine that with a more bedroom friendly version of the above teleporter, we’ll eventually have ourselves the best LAN party ever.


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Check out this beautiful video showing Verbatim’s Velve OLED lighting installations at the design library in Milan, Italy. Verbatim is showing some pretty neat design ideas, and of course the changing colors of the OLEDs are great. The Velve OLED lighting panels are made together by Mitsubishi and Pioneer, and are the world’s first color-tunable OLED lighting panels. The panels are 14x14cm in size and offer 28lm/W efficiency and 8,000 hours of lifetime. The typical CRI is 80.


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Samsung Electronics has tweaked its existing transparent LCD technology to make it energy efficient enough to be powered by ambient light. A working prototype was demoed at CeBIT 2011, one that has a viewable size of 46-inch and supports full HD resolution (1920×1080 pixels) as well as providing with a full ten finger touchscreen surface. The panel, which uses vertical alignment display mode, is an improvement on the see-through LCD panel it showed at the SID 2010 in Seattle, in May last year.

A spokesperson for Samsung Electronics told us that there will be commercial models based on the technology soon and mentioned a fridge freezer as being a potential application. She declined to say whether the innovative solar panel would be rolled out to other similar products. The fact that Samsung has been able to cut down power consumption by such a margin that it can be powered by ambient light is an impressive feat.

Details about the other specifications of the panel – such as power consumption – as well as the position of the backlight unit (which we suspect is positioned at the top of the panel itself) haven’t been revealed.


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Since we all know that light can not travel through solid objects, we use extra short waves to “scan” the object, such as an X-ray machine for instance. As light passes through the layer (a solid object) it is scattered in both time and space, so an image projected on one side emerges blurry and unfocused on the other. However, Jochen Aulbach at the FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues, have found a way to sharpen things up. They figured that it should be possible to manipulate light so that the scattering it experiences as it passes through the layer leaves it focused.

The team achieved this through a trial and error process. They used a liquid crystal device which allows precise control of light, called a spatial light modulator (SLM), to manipulate 64-femtosecond-long laser pulses being projected onto a layer of paint. A detector measured the intensity and duration of the pulses that emerged from the other side. This information was then passed to a computer program that used it to tweak the SLM to make the next pulse arriving at the detector both brighter and less spread out in time.


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