There’s no power outlet, land-based internet connection or even a decent cell signal in sight, yet we’re posting this live, at fast broadband speeds. We’re miles deep into Camp Pendleton, connected to ViaSat’s SurfBeam 2 Pro Portable mobile satellite transceiver and sending data to and from ViaSat-1 located more than 20,000 miles above our heads. SurfBeam 2 wasn’t designed for us to kick back and surf the web in the middle of nowhere at speeds that we could barely achieve while tethered to a cable connection just a few years ago, but we’re doing just that, with ViaSat’s roughly $20,000 go-anywhere satellite broadband rig. We first heard about Pro Portable last month at CES, which the company is marketing towards military, emergency management personnel and even broadcasters — that’s right, the sat truck of the future fits inside a hand-carry suitcase, and sends HD video from the world’s most remote locations right back to broadcast centers at record speed, nearly eliminating that lag that makes certain CNN reports painful to watch.


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What is HTML5?

We’re sure by now you’ve heard the term “HTML5″ thrown around by the likes of Apple and Google. This is the next evolution of HTML, or Hyper Text Markup Language, which forms the backbone of almost every site on the Internet. HTML4, the last major iteration of the language, debuted in 1997 and has been subsequently poked and prodded so that it can handle the demands of the modern Web.

HTML4 has been tweaked, stretched and augmented beyond its initial scope to bring high levels of interactivity and multimedia to Web sites. Plugins like Flash, Silverlight and Java have added media integration to the Web, but not without some cost. In search of a “better user experience” and battery life, Apple has simply dropped support for some of these plugins entirely on mobile devices, leaving much of the media-heavy Internet inaccessible on iPads and iPhones. HTML5 adds many new features, and streamlines functionality in order to render these processor-intensive add-ons unnecessary for many common functions.

Assuming content providers sign on (and many are), this means you won’t have to worry about installing yet another plugin just to listen to a song embedded in a blog or watch a video on YouTube. Similarly, this is a big deal for platforms that either don’t support Flash (e.g., iPhone and iPad), or have well documented problems with it (e.g., Linux). It will be a particular boon to those smartphones for which supporting Flash has proven problematic.

Rough Timeline of Web Technologies

1991 HTML
1994 HTML2
1996 CSS1 + JavaScript
1997 HTML4
1998 CSS2
2000 XHTML1
2002 Tableless Web Design
2005 AJAX
2009 HTML5


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DJ street battles are about to get a whole lot more awesome. Nik Nowak created this incredible mobile sound system that looks and drives like a tank but contains all of the equipment a DJ needs to engage in epic spin wars. The Panzer Soundtank is packed full of speakers and a ton of sound equipment that will let you take a party on the go. Based on its size, it looks like it’ll leave a few bleeding eardrums and grouchy old men in its wake. When it moves it becomes obvious that the tank is a lot lighter than it looks in the photos. It may not be able to crush parked cars, but it will absolutely crush the competition in a DJ battle.


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A global smart buzzword, Galaxy S 2 set a record of 3 million global sales only in 55 days. Samsung Electronics said on July 3 that its flagship smartphone Galaxy S 2 has marked the accumulated global sales of 3 million units, 55 days after its initial release: Within the period, a unit of Galaxy S 2 was sold in every 1.5 seconds. This record shortens the record of 85 days of its predecessor Galaxy S, a ten-million global seller, by 30 days.


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Google has removed 26 malware infected apps from the Android Market that are believed to have compromised the personal data of thousands of users. Security firm Lookout said that the apps were likely created by the same developers who were responsible for a previous attack of Android malware called ‘Droiddream’ back in March. This affected 21 apps that were also suspended from the Android Market.

Given the moniker Droiddream Light, the malware had code associated with previous Droiddream samples and is believed to have affected between 30,000 and 120,000 users. Magic Photo Studio, Mango Studio, ET Team, BeeGoo, Droidplus and Glumobi were the six developers named as publishing malicious apps with names like Sexy Legs, Volume Manager, Quick SMS Backup and Tetris. None of the apps actually needed you to launch them on your device for the malicious bits to work, instead relying on an incoming voice call.


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Google announces Google Wallet

Putting to bed months of rumors, Google announced an “open” NFC-based mobile payments ecosystem that lets users pay for items by tapping their phone against a payment reader. “Your phone will be your wallet. Just tap, pay, and save,” said Stephanie Tilenius, Google’s VP of Commerce, announcing the platform at the Google Partner event in New York.

‘Google Wallet’ is a free Android app that securely stores multiple credit cards, or a Google prepaid card linked to your credit card (one that Google provides). When opened on an NFC-enabled smartphone, you can tap your phone against a supported payment reader and the item you want to purchase is instantly charged to your credit card.


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The first candidate is Ortus Technology that have released a Full HD MID-scale panel. The 4.8-inch display runs at 1920 x 1080 resolution for a whopping 458 pixels per inch; which in contrast, makes Apple’s 326ppi Retina Display look low-res.


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Smallest HD camera

If you’re looking for a portable camera that can record in HD, look no further. This chinese no-namer is called HDMI Video Pen HD Camcorder. It comes in a shape of a highlighter and is capable of recording 720p resolution videos and 7 megapixel photos. It can also be used as a webcam, by connecting it directly to your TV with a mini-HDMI connector.


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Microsoft Research had its TechForum event yesterday where it showcased some of it’s latest projects to the press. Windows Phone 7 happily took the center stage this year in several demonstrations. In the first video after the break you will see Microsoft Chief Research and Technology Officer, Craig Mundie, demonstrated a new UI controlled by an HTC HD7. This may or may not be what we can expect to see in the upcoming Windows 8 but it definitely shows us where Microsoft is heading with regards to UI and NUIs.


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Google now offers cloud printing

Back in April 2010 Google announced Google Cloud Print, a service that in Beta allows printing from any app on any device, OS or browser without the need to install any software. Just last month they opened Google Cloud Print to users in the Chrome notebook pilot program. January 24th, they announce the beta launch of Google Cloud Print for mobile documents and Gmail for mobile, which they’ll be rolling out to users throughout the next few days.

Imagine printing an important document from your smartphone on the way to work and finding the printout waiting for you when you walk in the door. Just open a document in Google Docs or an email in Gmail in your mobile browser and choose “Print” from the dropdown menu in the top right corner. You can also print certain kinds of email attachments (such as .pdf or .doc) by clicking the “Print” link that appears next to them.

This feature will work on most phones that support HTML5, such as devices running Android 2.1+ and iOS 3+. To get started, you’ll need to connect your printer to Google Cloud Print. This step requires a Windows PC for now, but Linux and Mac support are coming soon. You can learn more at the Google Cloud Print help center.

Source: Google Blog


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