Like any scripting language, PHP can be used in a variety of applications. The down-side for most programmers is that when they learn how to write PHP, they do not always learn how to write PHP with speed and optimization in mind. This article addresses most common ways you can improve your code with minor changes that will yield large gains as well as teach you how to become a better PHP developer.


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MSI has just launched their newest Big Bang series motherboard, the XPower II, a product targeted to overclockers and gamers. This board is based on the Intel X79 chipset, features 8 DIMM slots that support a total of 128GB of system memory, 4-way SLI/CrossFire X with four PCI Express 3.0 x16 slots (x16, x8, x8, x8) as well as three PCI Express 2.0 x16 slots (x1, x1, x1), six SATA-600 ports, four SATA-300 ports, eight-channel audio (Realtek ALC892), two Gigabit Ethernet ports (Intel 82579V and 82574L), four USB 3.0 ports, and six USB 2.0 ports.

The MSI Big Bang-XPower II X79 motherboard features a 22-phase PWM voltage regulator circuit, military-class components, voltage measuring points, and several of MSI’s proprietary technologies, including Click BIOS II, OC Genie II, Super Charger, Winki 3, Instant OC, and Superpipe.

More pictures and detailed features are inside.


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Intel Corp. is yet again repeating the “upgrade card” strategy, which it first employed with the Nehalem G6952 CPU. Intel has announced new $50 upgrades for three Sandy Bridge series processors — the 2.6 GHz 2 core/2 thread G622, the 3.1 GHz 2 core/4 thread i3-2102, and the 2.1 GHz 2 core/4 thread i3-2312.

The upgrade buys you an undisclosed increase in clock speeds (and in the i3-2312′s case, increased cache as well). All in all, this nets you around a 15 percent average performance bump.


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Traditional hard disk drives or HDDs, have moving parts that take time to get from point A to point B. Think of them aa Cassette tape, it takes time to get from the part of the song you were listening to, to the part you want to be at. While a HDD is many times faster than a cassette drive they are both loosely based on the same magnetic recording technology. Unlike a Cassette, a hard disk platter can spin up to 170 MPH to find the appropriate information you are looking for. This can vary based on the number of rotations per minute or RPM that the platter can do (between 3,000 all the way up to 15,000 for high performance servers). To improve performance even further people began defragmenting their hard disk drives in order to put the most important information on the “outside of the HDD” where the platter could find it the quickest. Despite what may seem like a fast way to do things, consumers have experienced the drag that even the fastest hard disk drive could not rectify. This is where Solid State Drives come in.


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Samsung and Nokia are offering first WebCL implementations for Webkit and Firefox. The technology showcases the horsepower of complex web apps that not only render graphics on the GPU via WebGL, but open the door to fast image and video processing as well as advanced web games that feature realistic physics effects as well.

WebCL was announced by Khronos in March of this year as a new browser platform project that aims to leverage multicore processors and GPUs to enable highly parallel processing of applications. IE9, Chrome 11 and higher as well as Firefox 4 and higher integrate GPU acceleration, which is, however, limited to displayed and layered web content. Only Firefox and Chrome support WebGL, which was finalized as a standard back in March.


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If you’ve stayed with friends who live in European cities, you’ve probably had an experience like this: You hop onto their WiFi or wired internet connection and realize it’s really fast. Way faster than the one that you have at home. It might even make your own DSL or cable connection feel as sluggish as dialup.

You ask them how much they pay for broadband.
“Oh, forty Euros.” That’s about $56.
“A week?” you ask.
“No,” they might say. “Per month. And that includes phone and TV.”

It’s really that bad. The nation that invented the internet ranks 16th in the world when it comes to the speed and cost of our broadband connections. That’s according to a study released last year by Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society on behalf of the FCC.

Engadget did a full coverage on this matter. Video and full report inside.


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In the rankings of the world’s most powerful supercomputers, a Japanese machine has earned the top spot with a performance that essentially laps the competition. The computer, known as “K Computer,” is three times faster than a Chinese rival (Tianhe-1A) that previously held the top position, said Jack Dongarra, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville who keeps the official rankings of computer performance.


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Google built the royalty-free WebM video format with the sophisticated VP8 compression technology that it obtained in its 2009 acquisition of On2. In addition to advancing the goal of open video for the Web, the search giant also used On2 technology compression techniques that VP8 relies on to compress individual video frames. The format is intended for use with lossy images as an alternative to the venerable JPEG. to build a new image format called WebP with the aim of reducing page load time by increasing the efficiency of image compression.

WebP uses some of the still-image Google conducted a large-scale study demonstrating that WebP offers an average file size savings of 39 percent. Despite the seemingly impressive results, not everybody is convinced by Google’s findings. Mozilla, which has officially refused to support the format in Firefox, has emerged as one of WebP’s most prominent opponents. Building mainstream support for a new media format is challenging, especially when the advantages are ambiguous. WebM was attractive to some browser vendors because its royalty-free license arguably solved a real-world problem. According to critics, the advantages of WebP are illusory and don’t offer sufficient advantages over JPEG to justify adoption of the new format.


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According to Gayu Eusegi, head of global product development for Mitsubishi, the Lancer Evolution X will be the last Evo the Japanese automaker ever builds. Eusegi says the move is part of a shift in strategy to put the company’s product focus and ethos on leadership in EV technology.

To that end, Autocar indicates that Mitsubishi will release eight fully-electric or hybrid-electric cars by the time 2015 rolls around, and make a grab for a big portion of the CO2-reduction market share. It goes without saying that the fun-yet-fuel-swilling Evo just doesn’t fit that mindset, particularly since it apes a rally car that no longer exists. Despite the Evo’s huge popularity, Mitsubishi apparently isn’t scared of the step and says it’s confident that consumers will gloom on to the idea and rally behind the brand. By killing the Evo, they’re making their intentions plain to an increasingly environmentally-conscious car-buying public.


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Speed standards have been redefined anew, as researchers hit the 100 terabit per second benchmark.

Although the commercial needed for it is yet to be realized, two separate researchers just announced that they’ve hit a record of 100 terabit of information per second through a single optic fiber. Downloading will never be the same again if these go mainstream.

Dayou Qian of NEC Laboratories in Princeton New Jersey and Jun Sakaguchi of Japan’s National Institute of Information and Communications Technology in Tokyo have reported to have reached the 100 terabit benchmark. Both have used different methods: Dayou Qian squeezed light pulses from 370 separate lasers into one pulse, while Jun Sakaguchi utilizes seven light-guiding cores in a fiber — with each core carrying 15.6 terabit per second.


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Rogers has announced it’s lighting up 150Mbps LTE in four Canadian cities this year. Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver are setting the stage for an additional 21 market rollout in 2012. Sure, that theoretical 150Mbps — with an announced upstream of 70Mbps — may shift a whole lot when this all gets real, but seriously, compared to HSPA+ those speeds are astounding. Canadians eager to get a bit more info can take a peek at Roger’s new LTE site (link inside) and cast a vote for your hometown to be part of the 2012 expansion. Rogers hasn’t mentioned a date just yet — or if they plan on all four areas going live at once — but you can be sure that we’ll be keeping close tabs on all the details and grabbing some hands-on experiences with launch devices as soon as we can.


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Xeon E7 10-core

Intel has unveiled their new E-Series of Xeon Processors today. According to Intel, these processors will bring unparalleled advances in CPU performance and power efficiency. The new E Series Processors can have up to 10 Cores and 20 Threads with HT (Hyper Threading) enabled. It will have 30MB of Last Level Cache, Advanced Encryption Standards, Up to 2 Terabytes of DDR3 Memory and Low Voltage Support. These series also incorporate the benefits of the Sandy Bridge architecture, its support for new security processing instructions, and the improved power management technology.


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At this time there is almost all technical data required to talk about AMD’s next Dual-GPU graphics card.

Not a lot of time has passed since AMD announced Radeon 6990, when ATI-Forums.de released the specs for the upcoming Radeon HD 7990. The naming scheme for HD 6900 series cards brought some changes to card positioning. Follow it, the next flagship targeted at Q2 2012 should carry the name of AMD Radeon HD 7990 after successful launch of Radeon HD 6990 – current AMD’s flagship. There is no secret that Radeon HD 7000 line-up will use 28nm process technology manufactured chips, compared to 40nm chips used for latest Radeon HD 6000 products.


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This office on wheels is the second-generation business class creation from Brabus tuning studio. The new S600 iBusiness 2.0 is bloated with the latest technology. It offers two iPad2 tablets with built-in WiFi connection and a special iPad app that allows you to easily manage a proprietary COMAND system from Mercedes-Benz, including navigation, music, telephone and options to control the passenger’s comfort.

Small tables are situated right underneath the tablets for your bluetooth keyboards. On top of everything else (literally!), there is a 15.2-inch LCD screen, which hides in the roof.

As for the car specs, Brabus iBusiness 2,0 stands up to its name with 800hp and 1047Nm of torque from a twin-turbocharged V12, accelerating this piece of real estate from 0 to 60 in 3.9 seconds (with a limiter set to 350 km/h). Brabus also offers a full iBusiness 2.0 package for any S-class – from a modest S350 to S65.


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The day has come. After much anticipation, AMD has released their new powerhouse flagman – Radeon HD 6990. With a price tag of $699, it certainly deserves a ‘world’s fastest’ title. The 6990 boasts a massive 4GB of GDDR5, 3,072 Stream Processors, 64 ROPs, and an 830MHz core clock speed. A dual-BIOS switch will let you crank that clock up to 880MHz with a corresponding increase in voltage, but don’t expect to see much overclocking headroom above that.


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